Week 16 Pitch Day

Welcome to Pitch Day! Meet our judges:

Advertisements

Week 14 Dec. 3

Today we’ll talk about branding and announcing your launch.

Design Worksheet

Sample press releases/social media releases:

Pandora Launches Podcast Offering Powered by the Podcast Genome Project

Product Launch Press Release Template

 

Week 13 Pitching

Nov. 26

Today we’ll work on your pitches. Pitch Day is just three weeks away!

Meet our Pitch Day judges:

Final Project Assignment

Launch Plan Assessment

Media Startup Pitch Day Judging Sheet

Pitching

A good pitch needs to simply and clearly answer these questions:

  • Market — Who wants this?
  • Features — What are you going to do for the people who want or need it?
  • Mockup — What will it look like?
  • Sustainability — How will you attract users/customers and create enough revenue to sustain the business?
  • Risks – What is the competition and what things could go wrong?
  • Team — Why are you and your co-founders the right people to do this?

Early version of Airbnb pitchdeck

Redesigned Airbnb pitchdeck

Your pitch deck should include:

  1. Cover slide
  2. Problem
  3. Solution
  4. Market — validation/size
  5. Product
  6. Business model
  7. Competition
  8. Competitive advantages
  9. Go-to-market strategy
  10. Team
  11. Projections
  12. Needs

Readings:

Pitch Examples:

Final Project Assignment

Launch Plan Assessment

Media Startup Pitch Day Judging Sheet

We’ll also work on your pitches. Demo Day is three weeks away!

A good pitch needs to simply and clearly answer these questions:

  • Market — Who wants this?
  • Features — What are you going to do for the people who want or need it?
  • Mockup — What will it look like?
  • Sustainability — How will you attract users/customers and create enough revenue to sustain the business?
  • Risks – What is the competition and what things could go wrong?
  • Team — Why are you and your co-founders the right people to do this?

News Entrepreneurship Pitch Exercise

This week in your groups you’ll review what you have accomplished so far and begin to fill in the holes. You should also discuss your 10-minute pitch and start working on your  presentation materials.

For Dec. 10: Be ready to do a dry run of your presentation for the class. We’ll give you feedback and get you ready for Pitch Day on Dec. 17!

Week 12 Matt Saincome/Writing a Business Plan

Nov, 5, 2018

Matt Saincome, founder of the punk-themed satirical news website The Hard Times and Outvoice, a system that makes it easier for editors to pay freelancers

Today we’re going to talk about the dollars and cents of publishing: the budget. We’ll discuss how to figure out how much this venture is going to cost, how you can make it profitable and where you can get money to finance your project.

Kickstarter vs. Indiegogo

The Benefits and Drawbacks of Indiegogo and Kickstarter

We’ll also look at some recent digital media launches including:

Startup Capital: 6 Ways To Fund Your Businesses

How to Write a Business Plan, Small Business Administration

Digital Publishing budget discussion

DOWNLOAD: Startup Budget Worksheet

Budget discussion questions:

Startup Phase

  1. What is your minimal viable product?
  2. What do you need to produce it?
  3. What will it cost to produce it?
  4. What other start-up expenses will you have?
  5. How much do you need in start-up funding?
  6. How will you raise start-up capital? Where will you seek start-up capital — venture capitalists, partnership with an organization, crowdfunding campaign, bank loans, Small Business Association loan, friends/family?

Business Budgeting

  1. How will you pay staff — full-time salaries, part-time, no pay at first?
  2. Will you have an office or have people work from home? What will your office need — furniture, equipment, phone, Internet, etc.?
  3. Technology costs — domain, app development, website costs, software, etc.
  4. Consider different sources of revenue — paid content,  membership, product sales, events, digital advertising, print advertising, native advertising. How do you plan to get revenue? How much money could these revenue sources realistically bring in in Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, Year 4 and Year 5?
  5. What will your various revenue sources cost (venue rental, food, AV, etc. for events; wholesale costs of merchandise; ad salesperson for advertising, etc.)
  6. What other expenses will you have?
  7. Discuss the scale of your start-up — low-budget (no paid staff, no office), medium budget (a few paid staff, bare-bones office), high budget (full staff, office).

 

Week 10 Planning Your Minimum Viable Product/Revenue Streams

Where’s the Money?

Group discussion:

Revenue streams:

Come up with 5 possible revenue streams for your business. Possibilities include:

  • Subscription
  • Memberships
  • Sponsored content
  • Events, classes, workshops, conferences
  • Merchandise
  • Discount program (like Groupon, Travelzoo)

Next: Think about your minimum viable product — what can you actually produce in the next 7 weeks?

 

Week 9 Identifying Your Target Audience/Needfinding

Needfinding

Student presentations: Joy, Antonio, Myah, Alexis, Zanesha

Mission Statements and Tag Lines

Brit + Co

Start with a simple statement using this formula:

1. Who you are
2. What you do
3. Who you do it for

4. Where you do it (optional)

 

Who you are What you do Who you do it for Where  or how you do it (optional)
Brit + Co is a media company that inspires, educates and entertains real women with a creative spirit.

Sample mission statements:

Brit + Co

Chow

Reveal

Mashable

Chefsfeed

Identify Your Target Audience

Target Audience Profile #1

Example of a target audience profile: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDEqLkqUryY

Target Audience Profile #2

Needfinding

Discussion questions:

1) Who are your target readers?

2) What are their needs?

3) How can your publication fulfill those needs?

Using theNeedfinding Toolkit, design a needfinding experiment that will help you get to know your target readers and their needs. It can be a focus group, an online questionnaire or a series of one-on-one interviews. Unlike with most journalism assignments, you MAY interview friends, relatives, roommates, co-workers but they must be in the target audience for your publication. Draft questions that will help you understand your target readers and their needs better. You may ask specific questions about the type of content your publication should include, advertisers that would appeal to readers, logos, design, story ideas, etc.